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about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house pre ♪ >> this is book tv's live coverage of the national books s festival
for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
of civil rights in this country, and we have some blockbuster cases being heard by the supreme court. one of those cases involves a permanent action. abigail fisher applied to the diversity of texas and was denied admission. the university has a policy of along the top 10% of the academic performance to be automatically eligible to go into the class. for the percentage of the remainder, race is one of the criteria. fisher is suing because she was denied admission. that case will decide the future of racial preferences in this country. that is one of the leading cases being heard. the voting rights, a challenge to the voting rights act. this is our most critically important civil-rights statute ever enacted in this country. the court may accept a challenge to this statute, enacted in law in 1965, renewed as recently as 2006, by an overwhelming number of democratic and republican members of congress. there are some who basically want to gut the voting rights act. and then finally, the other set of huge cases involve cave rights -- gay rights, a challenge to the defense of marriage statutes,
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
. >>> today also marks a milestone in the civil right movement. half a century ago james meredith confronted racism head on. >> that's right. he was the first african american student at ole miss and tonight the campus is marking the day with an anniversary celebration, but as randall pinkston reports, meredith himself remains a reluctant hero. >> reporter: students gathered in tribute on the campus where james meredith made history. >> i know i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for him. >> i'm proud to attend this school. >> reporter: 50 years ago meredith was the first african american student to attend university of mississippi. his trouble became a flash point in the civil rights movement. a defiant governor ross barnett repeatedly blocked him from enrolling and angry mobs rioted in the streets, but on october 1st, 1962, meredith attended his first classes at ole miss. today he remains a reluctant hero. >> for 50 years people have been thanking me, congratulating me. it wasn't james meredith. it was god all the time. >> reporter: after meredith mississippi gradually desegregated all of it
the law is outdated and unnecessary. a big lineup of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. francis coe, nbc news. >>> here is a look at other stories making news early today in america. in maine a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the ban of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> karma geddon two has come to an end just for the end of the rush hour. the demolition job that shut down the 405 freeway hit a snag when the column collapsed. despite the hurdle, work crews completed a major component of the four-year expansion project. >>> in kentucky, a test of strength was on display. 34 teams of 20 people battled to see who could pull a 757 cargo plan 12 feet in the fastest time. the competitors showed the money as well as some muscle. all of the teams raised a thousand dollars for the special olympics. all for a good cause. >>> finally, hawaiians continued their love af
sparked hate speech against jews on campus. the u.s. education department civil rights office is investigating. >>> the new archbishop of san francisco will be installed in about 90 minutes from now. about 2,000 people will witness the ceremony for salvatore cordileone at st. mary's cathedral. protestors are expected outside. that's because the bishop has a reputation as a fierce defender of the church's opposition to same-sex marriage. and we'll have a live stream of the ceremony on cbssf.com when it begins. >>> early surveys show a lift for mitt romney after what many say was a strong debate performance. a positively undecided voters shows romney won last night by a 2-1 margin. cbs reporter tara mergener has the latest from the white house. >> reporter: mitt romney set the debate tone early. >> under the president's policy middle income americans have been buried. >> reporter: energetic and agrees ever, romney slammed the president's economic record and laid out his own plan. >> there will be no cut that adds to the deficit. >> reporter: but the president repeatedly insisted
fighting a civil rights and virginia. we have a state where they want to go backward. the federal government can do a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services. meaning the federal dollars -- to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services, to include housing. housing is a critical element in recovery. i guess my thought process goes -- somehow forced the state to discriminate against recovery, like they do in virginia, to spend some of the federal dollars on the offensive recovery support services. that is the nature of my thought process. by doing so, we can really reduce --, help recovery. to block out recovery people -- it is just insane to me. the state is not going to change. but the federal government if you just make a rule or regulation, you have got to spend a small amount of recovery and stop blowing it to agencies and virginia. i would be glad to elaborate after the press conference, of course. but that is the general thought and presidents. -- precedence. >> we have some programs that are specific arou
by a drone. >> hi, i am a holocaust survivor and a civil rights veteran. and what i see happening in this country as they move towards fascism, which very much resembles that of our germany, which silenced pretty much the labor movement, which restrict to voter participation in the media as well. we no longer have the media that takes on the lives that are being spread and that we are being fed on a daily basis. there are very few outlets we can actually read or hear the truth of what is happening in our government. and my fear is that we are going down a really steep and quick ascent into fascism and i think that is very worrisome. and i am a fighter and i have no idea anymore how this can be stopped because i don't see that there is a movement. he says even when it's hopeless, we have to continue to battle, but there doesn't seem to be a cohesive movement like there was in the 60s. do you have any suggestions about how we can go about this or that she would even agree with the aspect of where we are headed. >> if there is enough people who believe that, then at cnn difference in
. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today, there are so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they did not want james meredith there. your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we got to get order up there. that's what we thought was going to happen. >> mr. president, please, why don't you stop -- >> how can i remove him governor when there's a riot in the street and he might step out of the building and something -- let's get order up there and then we can do something. >> we've got to get somebody out there to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i know the tone from my aunts and uncles. civil rights went from being important but not a heated issue during his pres
and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you can see the economy improving bit by bit by middle class people aren't doing that much better. people at the top are doing real well. corporations are reporting profits, but the people in the middle aren't doing that well. back in the old days tbhak the heyday of the middle class, everybody sharedded in that prosperity. today everybody doesn't share in that prosperity. that's why so many people feel so much pain. >> suarez: you take us again and again in the book to key moments where things could have gone
of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> carmageddon 2 has come to an end just in time for this morning's rush hour in california. the demolition job that shut down a portion of l.a.'s 405 freeway hit a snag when a column collapsed. work crews completed a major component of the four-year expansion project. >>> in kentucky, a test of strength was on display. 34 teams of 20 people battled to see who could pull a 757 cargo plane 12 feet in the fastest time. the competitors showed the money as well as some muscle. all of the teams raised money for the special olympics. >>> finally, hawaiians continued their love affair with spasm hundreds gathered to build the world's
. and that feels right. why not have nice speech? but the civil rights movement and the protests sitting on a lunch hall and refusing to leave on a lunch counter because they're racist, it's important not to be civil all the time. >> bill: if i go down there and i call somebody a pinhead, am i arrested by the campus police? >> you, according to their code, would be kicked out of school. >> bill: is that right? wow! >> probably wouldn't do it for pinhead. >> bill: wow. i bet you they would if it were me. i bet you they would. >> you do much worse. >> bill: the guys in "animal house" they're not going to the university of north carolina. that's not happening. that movie could have never been made if all the colleges had these. >> these codes are since animal house. in response to "animal house." >> bill: tell them time coming down if they don't knock it off. when we come right back, strange twist to a strange case of welfare fraud. the woman who committed it was a big lottery winner and now she's done. legal is next >> bill: i'm bill o'reilly. legal segment, gay marriage, a mysterious death and terro
button topics including same-sex marriage, and a challenge to a key civil rights law, the voting rights act, requiring states with a history of discrimination to get approval from the feds before making any changes to election and voting rules. shannon covers the court for us and is live in washington. shannon, what is left to be settled here? >>guest: well, when it comes to the health care law you will remember back if june the court uphell the individual mandate and rules on other issues involving the expansion of medicaid but there are many other portions of the law the high court did not rule on including the employer mandate. that is one of the elements that the liberty university has been challenging from the going. today the court indicated it is willing to take the issue seriously by giving the administration 30 days to respond to a request by liberty university for a rehearing on that issue. >>shepard: that is one thing. what are the odds it will make it before the court? >>guest: many court watchers who believe the university has a good shot at a second chance. >> they have go
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
workers to the civil-rights campaigns in the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's to the environmental movement. we're taking those lessons and moving forward as we look at a larger pat the militarism. this is not just about libya or somalia or iraq or afghanistan. we're talking about iran, the future, and asking ourselves, how we feel safer when we are involved in more bases and countries than we have been in history? >> dave philipps, place as here today, here in colorado springs. for people across the country who do not understand this city at the foot of the rockies, talk about its military significance for the country. >> and a lot of ways colorado springs is an average town in terms of demographics, in terms of crime rates. just about anything you look at in the senses. the big difference is by far our largest industry, if you want to call it that, is the department of defense. how many active duty to we have here in colorado springs? over 50,000, i believe. that really is the lifeblood of our town. >> this investigation that you did, the unit called lethal warriors, share with us what it is
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
for the new term -- expected to be, civil rights. >>> plus kobe bryant, dropping a little insight on what it's like to play pick-up with the president. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. my brother doesn't look like a heart attack patient. i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i'm a fighter and now i don't have that fear. i'm a fighter you're not just looking for a by house. eyes you're looking for a place for your life to happen. want my recipe for healthier hair color? natural instincts! formulated with aloe, vitamin and antioxidants natural instincts has a system that's a healthier way to radiant color. indulge... with natural instincts. less guilt, more gorgeous. bori
how african- americans were able to drive legislations in the civil-rights movement and say as a blueprint, let's take the amount of resources we have and you put that with voting and you have a different result. >> we me to go back to that same model and make sure we implement that in this next term. >> if anybody could jump in and answer this, and that is, let's say you go through november, let's say president, democrats, 50% holds up. 90% of black folks hold up. are you going to see african- americans and hispanics make it clear that they have to have an inside and outside game, and that is you have folks on the inside who say we are working with you, but then the extra forces on the outside who are also pushing as well to get what you want, and otherwise be risks folks saying let's don't have an extra row game, all of you are left with is an internal dane, and we can ignore it. that is a danger when it comes to getting what you want. >> i think every time you put all your eggs in one basket there's a danger they will get broken. i disagree that is what happened. the last
they say it vital their civil rights and causing outrage on both sides. >> having to put a sign on your door on halloween is like branding somebody. so when it's a scarlet letter or it's a yellow star of david for the nazi germany, you know, it's something that distinguishes everybody and actually makes them an outcast in their own community. >> i think it's a reasonable ordinance that the city has passed to help protect and keep us a safe city. >> gretchen: giving us the take is the host of "justice," judge jeanine pirro. all right. so i'm a parent. he's a parent, you're a parent. if you go out trick or troating with your kids, you night want to know if you're going to the house of a sex offender. >> you're right. the first obligation of government is protection of its citizens. as i listened to that attorney say it's like branding them, first of all, you can't even compare a predator pedophile to someone who is a victim of a holocaust. but let's get past that. they say it's a violation of their civil rights, first and 14th amendments, protected speech. that's hogwash. here is the bott
decisions of our time in july the justices returned from their break and begin a new term dominated by civil rights issues. joining me from the supreme court, nbc news justice correspondent pete williams. pete, we're talking about major cases that will reshape potentially reshape policy for the united states on affirmative action, voting rights, and on gay marriage. >> very much so. let's begin with affirmative action president the court will hear that case next week. every selective university in america uses it in some manner to achieve a racially diverse campus. this is a case from the university of texas. a young high school student there did not qualify automatically as the top 10% of graduates in texas do for admission, so she was looked at in in the remainder of the other 25% of the class, race is a factor, says that's unconstitutional. nine years ago the supreme court gave the green light to colleges to use affirmative action if there were no race neutral methods to get to diversity. the question is whether the court has changed and become more conservative when they look at it they
's" top five. in 1962, 29-year-old veteran named james meredith took a giant step for civil rights when he became the first black student at the university of mississippi. at the time segregation was still the norm across much of the south. mississippi's governor and lt. governor had lock mr.ed james meredith from enrollment not once but three times. then a federal court stepped in and gave the okay. thousands of white stiewntsdz and others responded with large scale riots. tear glass filled the air at least two people died. u.s. marshals surrounded the student as he walked across campus to his first day of class now, the machine different story. minorities make up 24% of the student body and there is a statue to the man who changed ole miss forever 50 years ago today and no you know the news for this monday, october the 1st, 2012 i'm shepard smith. we're back tom
the supreme court is set to take up a slew of cases some dealing with civil rights following the blockbuster decisions we all watched last term, involving immigration and president obama's health care law. shannon bream now with the news from washington. shannon? >> monday kicks off the brand new term in the supreme court and there are a number of controversial disputes awaiting the justices. at least six of nine justices attended the traditional pre-term red mass in washington on sunday, a tradition started back in 1928 in new york, praers for wisdom and inspiration for all members of the judiciary. on monday the court will consider whether nigeria citizens can sue shell oil company in u.s. court for human rights abuses they say the company committed in nigeria, one of the most anticipated, student who she was not admitted to the university because of race based. and justice kennedy will be the swing vote in that case and expected to take up one case related to same sex marriage and defense of marriage act which the obama administration says it will no longer defend in court. another appeal
released audiotapes that show kennedy's real views on the civil rights movement, cuban missile crisis and george romney. all of that when "now" starts in a mere 180 seconds. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing what you know. let's do it grandpa. that's why humana agents will sit down with you, to listen and understand what's important to you. it's how we help you choose the right humana medicare plan for you. because when your medicare is taken care of, you can spend more time sharing your passions. wow. [ giggles ] [ male announ
could weaken if not entirely strike that down which would be an enormous change in a landmark civil rights law. >> take us inside the supreme court and how this works and how they decide what cases get done when and when we might hear some of these decisions. >> well, it's the same procedure. and it's unusual. because if you are in a state, the state supreme court must hear your case. not true here. the supreme court decides for the most part which cases to hear. it takes four votes mong the justices to grand a case. of course, takes five votes to win out of the nine. they confer on which cases they want to talk about. then they vote and then we hear about it on days like today when we get the orders list. but the reason i say with some confidence that they'll take the voting rights act case is because of the way the federal law works. if you get turned down by the federal government, the congress virtually requires the supreme court to hear those. i think it's likely they'll take up the voting rights challenge and the defense of marriage. >> pete williams, always good to see you. t
guaranteed act, on par with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have never been set up to be fair. what they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. once.ed for ross p
with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. john is an independent. hey there. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have neverwhat they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. i voted for ross perot once. i am
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)

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